Whose Birthday Are You Really Celebrating? J’Zeus or YaHuW’shuwa ?

The Greeks called their supreme deity “Zeus” but when they were receiving YaHuW’shuwa as their Messiah in the 1st Century, they began placing a letter “Y” in front of Zeus as Y’Zeus since Yah is the Hebrew name for the self-existent eternal Elohiym (God). From Y’Zeus, Ieosus became the Greek way to spell YaHuW’shuwa (Joshua). Later on when the English translations of the Bible went into print, a new letter was added to the alphabet—the letter “J” and it was meant to have the “Y” sound. From there J’Zeus or Ieosus became Jeosus in Greek as the transliteration for YaHuW’shuwa . The Greek transliteration of YaHuW’shuwa was supposed to sound like “Yeosus” or Ieosus but as time went on in American culture, the letter “J” began to take on the pronunciation of the hard “G” sound. Hence today, the name Jesus sounds more like “Geezus” than the Greek “Yaysoos” or the Hebrew YaHuW’shuwa . “Geezus” means nothing to people living in Yisra’el or Hebrew speaking people. But YaHuW’shuwa (Joshua) is his real name given to him by his heavenly Father. To see evidence for the name Zeus in the King James Bible, click on this link: The Name “Zeus” in the 1611 King James Bible

In Latin the term “Io” means “hail” or “praise.” Hence on December 25th in Ancient Rome, people would give praises to the god Saturn on December 25th as they would shout “Io, Saturnalia, Io, Saturnalia!” This was a day for drunkenness, orgies, child sacrifices and debauchery. Later on the Roman pagan god of Jupiter & the Greek pagan god Zeus were merged into J’Zeus and so the phrase “Io Zeus, Io Zeus” was also used to say “Praise Zeus.” The Greek transliteration for the name of our Messiah went from YaHuW’shuwa to Ieosus and this is how we came to the name J’Zeus. So you see, Io Zeus is the same thing as Ieosus which means “Praise Zeus!”

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